Book Review: Light is the New Black

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Why do you continue to play music? Is it because you found that you could earn a living through performing or teaching? Is it because you want to see how far you can improve your technique? Or is it because you want to share your talent with the world?

Even if it’s for any of those reasons it’s also because of this. It lights you up.

In light is the new black, Rebecca Campbell tells of her journey which led her from being a successful creative director in advertising to spiritual guide thanks to one enlightening moment. The moment she realised she was on the wrong path. Her real path is where she can express her light, her true calling, and this book is her way of inspiring the reader to do the same.

Even if you don’t see yourself as a spiritual person, light is the new black has plenty to offer anyone who needs the encouragement to follow their heart. It’s overall message of being true to yourself and following your calling is one that we can all do with being reminded of from time to time. For the moments when our minds begin to question ourselves, Rebecca offers some simple meditations to try which aim to deepen the connection with your inner calling and which are a good place to start if you’ve never tried meditation before. Overall, I think this is a book that everyone can connect with in some way, and whether you feel like you are shining your light or not, you’ll find something in here that inspires you to do so.

Why a ‘perfect’ performance is not always the best

When analysing any musical performance, it is easy to focus solely on those elements which are traditionally seen as being the building blocks of music – pitch, rhythm and dynamics for example. Whilst these are no doubt fundamental in the accurate portrayal of any piece, and mastery of them alone may appear to create that ‘perfect’ performance, should these elements be allowed to be the ultimate goal when it comes to a musical performance?all-that-counts-in-life-is-intention-quote-1

I would argue not. Although I’m not a composer, I’m pretty sure that if you asked the vast majority of them what they would like a performer of their music to ensure that they get right when they perform, it has everything to do with intention and less to do with the actual instructions which have been provided in the score. For it is often those elements which cannot be fully notated – the length of a pause or breath, the exact use of an accented note or the way in which a crescendo is executed for example, which can only ever be controlled by the performer themselves in the moment and which require a thorough understanding of what the piece is really trying to say in order to bring a piece to life.

And because of this, there may be a price to pay when it comes to being ‘note perfect’. If the sole focus remains on the notes alone during a performance, then the real intention of the piece is not given any attention. Of course, the intention of some pieces is to be precise and that is all, and professional performers at the top of their game are quite rightly expected to never get a note wrong. But for those of us who are still striving to progress in our musical abilities, and particularly those who are new to performing itself, I feel that if the intention of the piece is allowed to be the overriding aspect of the performance, then it will be a successful one, despite any misplacement of notes or details which may take place. It will also be a personal one, where performer and perhaps teacher have worked together on what the intention of the piece is, from their own and the composers point of view, and have sought to use the performers current skill level and musical abilities to shape the piece in a way which is possible and suitable.

So the next time that you hear a live performance that you particularly like, try to think to yourself why that is? I can almost guarantee that it will go beyond the basic elements to deliver music which has it’s focus firmly on intention and not just on what it’s composer set down on a page.